Thursday, January 16, 2014

In My Research on the Persian Gulf, I Found Something Cool, But First My Pond!

The bodies of water of all sizes across our planet have always fascinated me.  Their presence has had the ability, for the eons, to sooth the human soul.  Back in the 90s I became interested in water gardening, and began creating tiny ponds in the places where I lived.  I am certain I will find ways to water garden in Kuwait.  Look forward to seeing pictures and videos of my efforts.

We have a pond directly in front of our house here at the ranch, and it is a constant source of delight for both of us.  The Eco System of this little man made body of water is a never-ending source of entertainment for both Randy and I.  In fact, I have rented and used a backhoe to improve the pond, and engineer into it some flood control elements. When we first arrived the pond was in rather sad shape, and as it went down the West side of the house, it turned into a swamp.  After about three weeks of dirt work, that area turned into a channel that goes back to another smaller  pond with an island in the center.

I love sitting on my porch, and looking out across the pond when it rains.













 I love these next pictures with mist on the pond early in the morning.


 This is one of the latest pictures of the pond made this fall.

 When Randy was home for Christmas, I took this photo of Alisha, Pickle, and he sitting on the dock feeding the ducks and the fish.

I will be leaving my pond, but I will be arriving in Kuwait to water garden and explore the Persian Gulf!

Already I have a special interest in that body of water, and the mystical mammal which swims in it's waters fascinates me. They say the origins of the mermaid legend arises from sightings of this animal which lives it's entire life in the water.  Tomorrow, the full story!




he rare and beautiful dugong inspired “tails” about mermaids. This strange creature faces extinction in the Middle East. Image via Christian Haugen.
Can you believe that between six and seven thousand “mermaids” still live in the shallow, saline waters of the Persian Gulf? Better known as dugongs or sea cows, these slow moving, gentle herbivores inhabit sea grass filled estuaries and mangrove swampy areas off Saudi Arabia, the UAE states, Bahrain, and Qatar. They also live in the Red Sea. But they are under danger of extinction. 
These aquatic mammals were once the subject of maritime tales dealing with mermaids, or half fish, half human creatures that lived in the sea and often called sailors to their death by encouraging them to jump overboard from their ships.
The dugong population in the Red Sea and in the Persian Gulf are estimated to be the second largest in the world, according to an article published a few years back by UN Environment Protection Agency’s Grida newsletter
dugong middle east photo

We need to protect these strange and beautiful mammals not at risk in the Persian Gulf and the Red Sea. Image via ThePatrick.
Recent construction projects in the Gulf’s coastal areas may have affected the relative safety that these creatures have been there for hundreds of years.
dugong persian gulf
Man made damage harms dugongs and other Gulf Wildlife
The impact of oil production, war, and all the construction projects in and around the Persian Gulf has naturally had an adverse effect on marine and other wildlife in this region.
Previous Green Prophet articles have mentioned Dubai and Abu Dhabi real estate projects such as Dubai’s Palm Island and The World artificial islands, which have caused considerable damage to marine life in the areas where these projects have been constructed, and are presently being constructed.
The best example is the largest of these projects, The World, which is now causing serious damage to coral reefs, kelp, and the very sea grass  that the dugong feed upon. As was noted in this article, the delicate eco-system of coral reefs, mangrove coastal areas and sea grass habitats, have been depleted by more than 35%.
The sea water salinity in the Gulf has also increased, affecting sea life.  It was also noted that Island project promoters plan to import a number of dolphins from the Solomon Islands to add an extra attraction to the area, as well as creating a special “diver’s cave” where amateur scuba divers can hunt for “treasure” that the project promoters will put there for them.
In another article, a case study published in an American University educational website, one of the most constant threats posed to the dugongs of the Persian Gulf is that of water pollution; most especially water pollution as a result of oil spills.
With an enormous amount of the world’s oil supplies located in the Persian Gulf region, the transport of oil through the Persian Gulf is a fact of life. So too are oil spills. Oil in the water of the Persian Gulf destroys dugong habitats and is likely to have significant direct negative health effects on the dugong.
Efforts have been made to protect the dugong from being hunted or killed by fishermen when the mammals are trapped in fishing nets. Saudi Arabia and the UAE are signers to the CITES Agreement which is a world-wide resolution, adopted originally in 1963, to protect endangered animal species, of which the dudong and other similar species (manatee, etc) are now considered to be.
- See more at: http://www.greenprophet.com/2010/03/dugong-mermaid-persian-gulf/#sthash.TxbnqMdl.dpuf
he rare and beautiful dugong inspired “tails” about mermaids. This strange creature faces extinction in the Middle East. Image via Christian Haugen.
Can you believe that between six and seven thousand “mermaids” still live in the shallow, saline waters of the Persian Gulf? Better known as dugongs or sea cows, these slow moving, gentle herbivores inhabit sea grass filled estuaries and mangrove swampy areas off Saudi Arabia, the UAE states, Bahrain, and Qatar. They also live in the Red Sea. But they are under danger of extinction. 
These aquatic mammals were once the subject of maritime tales dealing with mermaids, or half fish, half human creatures that lived in the sea and often called sailors to their death by encouraging them to jump overboard from their ships.
The dugong population in the Red Sea and in the Persian Gulf are estimated to be the second largest in the world, according to an article published a few years back by UN Environment Protection Agency’s Grida newsletter
dugong middle east photo

We need to protect these strange and beautiful mammals not at risk in the Persian Gulf and the Red Sea. Image via ThePatrick.
Recent construction projects in the Gulf’s coastal areas may have affected the relative safety that these creatures have been there for hundreds of years.
dugong persian gulf
Man made damage harms dugongs and other Gulf Wildlife
The impact of oil production, war, and all the construction projects in and around the Persian Gulf has naturally had an adverse effect on marine and other wildlife in this region.
Previous Green Prophet articles have mentioned Dubai and Abu Dhabi real estate projects such as Dubai’s Palm Island and The World artificial islands, which have caused considerable damage to marine life in the areas where these projects have been constructed, and are presently being constructed.
The best example is the largest of these projects, The World, which is now causing serious damage to coral reefs, kelp, and the very sea grass  that the dugong feed upon. As was noted in this article, the delicate eco-system of coral reefs, mangrove coastal areas and sea grass habitats, have been depleted by more than 35%.
The sea water salinity in the Gulf has also increased, affecting sea life.  It was also noted that Island project promoters plan to import a number of dolphins from the Solomon Islands to add an extra attraction to the area, as well as creating a special “diver’s cave” where amateur scuba divers can hunt for “treasure” that the project promoters will put there for them.
In another article, a case study published in an American University educational website, one of the most constant threats posed to the dugongs of the Persian Gulf is that of water pollution; most especially water pollution as a result of oil spills.
With an enormous amount of the world’s oil supplies located in the Persian Gulf region, the transport of oil through the Persian Gulf is a fact of life. So too are oil spills. Oil in the water of the Persian Gulf destroys dugong habitats and is likely to have significant direct negative health effects on the dugong.
Efforts have been made to protect the dugong from being hunted or killed by fishermen when the mammals are trapped in fishing nets. Saudi Arabia and the UAE are signers to the CITES Agreement which is a world-wide resolution, adopted originally in 1963, to protect endangered animal species, of which the dudong and other similar species (manatee, etc) are now considered to be.
- See more at: http://www.greenprophet.com/2010/03/dugong-mermaid-persian-gulf/#sthash.TxbnqMdl.dpuf
he rare and beautiful dugong inspired “tails” about mermaids. This strange creature faces extinction in the Middle East. Image via Christian Haugen.
Can you believe that between six and seven thousand “mermaids” still live in the shallow, saline waters of the Persian Gulf? Better known as dugongs or sea cows, these slow moving, gentle herbivores inhabit sea grass filled estuaries and mangrove swampy areas off Saudi Arabia, the UAE states, Bahrain, and Qatar. They also live in the Red Sea. But they are under danger of extinction. 
These aquatic mammals were once the subject of maritime tales dealing with mermaids, or half fish, half human creatures that lived in the sea and often called sailors to their death by encouraging them to jump overboard from their ships.
The dugong population in the Red Sea and in the Persian Gulf are estimated to be the second largest in the world, according to an article published a few years back by UN Environment Protection Agency’s Grida newsletter
dugong middle east photo

We need to protect these strange and beautiful mammals not at risk in the Persian Gulf and the Red Sea. Image via ThePatrick.
Recent construction projects in the Gulf’s coastal areas may have affected the relative safety that these creatures have been there for hundreds of years.
dugong persian gulf
Man made damage harms dugongs and other Gulf Wildlife
The impact of oil production, war, and all the construction projects in and around the Persian Gulf has naturally had an adverse effect on marine and other wildlife in this region.
Previous Green Prophet articles have mentioned Dubai and Abu Dhabi real estate projects such as Dubai’s Palm Island and The World artificial islands, which have caused considerable damage to marine life in the areas where these projects have been constructed, and are presently being constructed.
The best example is the largest of these projects, The World, which is now causing serious damage to coral reefs, kelp, and the very sea grass  that the dugong feed upon. As was noted in this article, the delicate eco-system of coral reefs, mangrove coastal areas and sea grass habitats, have been depleted by more than 35%.
The sea water salinity in the Gulf has also increased, affecting sea life.  It was also noted that Island project promoters plan to import a number of dolphins from the Solomon Islands to add an extra attraction to the area, as well as creating a special “diver’s cave” where amateur scuba divers can hunt for “treasure” that the project promoters will put there for them.
In another article, a case study published in an American University educational website, one of the most constant threats posed to the dugongs of the Persian Gulf is that of water pollution; most especially water pollution as a result of oil spills.
With an enormous amount of the world’s oil supplies located in the Persian Gulf region, the transport of oil through the Persian Gulf is a fact of life. So too are oil spills. Oil in the water of the Persian Gulf destroys dugong habitats and is likely to have significant direct negative health effects on the dugong.
Efforts have been made to protect the dugong from being hunted or killed by fishermen when the mammals are trapped in fishing nets. Saudi Arabia and the UAE are signers to the CITES Agreement which is a world-wide resolution, adopted originally in 1963, to protect endangered animal species, of which the dudong and other similar species (manatee, etc) are now considered to be.
- See more at: http://www.greenprophet.com/2010/03/dugong-mermaid-persian-gulf/#sthash.TxbnqMdl.dpuf
he rare and beautiful dugong inspired “tails” about mermaids. This strange creature faces extinction in the Middle East. Image via Christian Haugen.
Can you believe that between six and seven thousand “mermaids” still live in the shallow, saline waters of the Persian Gulf? Better known as dugongs or sea cows, these slow moving, gentle herbivores inhabit sea grass filled estuaries and mangrove swampy areas off Saudi Arabia, the UAE states, Bahrain, and Qatar. They also live in the Red Sea. But they are under danger of extinction. 
These aquatic mammals were once the subject of maritime tales dealing with mermaids, or half fish, half human creatures that lived in the sea and often called sailors to their death by encouraging them to jump overboard from their ships.
The dugong population in the Red Sea and in the Persian Gulf are estimated to be the second largest in the world, according to an article published a few years back by UN Environment Protection Agency’s Grida newsletter
dugong middle east photo

We need to protect these strange and beautiful mammals not at risk in the Persian Gulf and the Red Sea. Image via ThePatrick.
Recent construction projects in the Gulf’s coastal areas may have affected the relative safety that these creatures have been there for hundreds of years.
dugong persian gulf
Man made damage harms dugongs and other Gulf Wildlife
The impact of oil production, war, and all the construction projects in and around the Persian Gulf has naturally had an adverse effect on marine and other wildlife in this region.
Previous Green Prophet articles have mentioned Dubai and Abu Dhabi real estate projects such as Dubai’s Palm Island and The World artificial islands, which have caused considerable damage to marine life in the areas where these projects have been constructed, and are presently being constructed.
The best example is the largest of these projects, The World, which is now causing serious damage to coral reefs, kelp, and the very sea grass  that the dugong feed upon. As was noted in this article, the delicate eco-system of coral reefs, mangrove coastal areas and sea grass habitats, have been depleted by more than 35%.
The sea water salinity in the Gulf has also increased, affecting sea life.  It was also noted that Island project promoters plan to import a number of dolphins from the Solomon Islands to add an extra attraction to the area, as well as creating a special “diver’s cave” where amateur scuba divers can hunt for “treasure” that the project promoters will put there for them.
In another article, a case study published in an American University educational website, one of the most constant threats posed to the dugongs of the Persian Gulf is that of water pollution; most especially water pollution as a result of oil spills.
With an enormous amount of the world’s oil supplies located in the Persian Gulf region, the transport of oil through the Persian Gulf is a fact of life. So too are oil spills. Oil in the water of the Persian Gulf destroys dugong habitats and is likely to have significant direct negative health effects on the dugong.
Efforts have been made to protect the dugong from being hunted or killed by fishermen when the mammals are trapped in fishing nets. Saudi Arabia and the UAE are signers to the CITES Agreement which is a world-wide resolution, adopted originally in 1963, to protect endangered animal species, of which the dudong and other similar species (manatee, etc) are now considered to be.
- See more at: http://www.greenprophet.com/2010/03/dugong-mermaid-persian-gulf/#sthash.TxbnqMdl.dpuf
he rare and beautiful dugong inspired “tails” about mermaids. This strange creature faces extinction in the Middle East. Image via Christian Haugen.
Can you believe that between six and seven thousand “mermaids” still live in the shallow, saline waters of the Persian Gulf? Better known as dugongs or sea cows, these slow moving, gentle herbivores inhabit sea grass filled estuaries and mangrove swampy areas off Saudi Arabia, the UAE states, Bahrain, and Qatar. They also live in the Red Sea. But they are under danger of extinction. 
These aquatic mammals were once the subject of maritime tales dealing with mermaids, or half fish, half human creatures that lived in the sea and often called sailors to their death by encouraging them to jump overboard from their ships.
The dugong population in the Red Sea and in the Persian Gulf are estimated to be the second largest in the world, according to an article published a few years back by UN Environment Protection Agency’s Grida newsletter
dugong middle east photo

We need to protect these strange and beautiful mammals not at risk in the Persian Gulf and the Red Sea. Image via ThePatrick.
Recent construction projects in the Gulf’s coastal areas may have affected the relative safety that these creatures have been there for hundreds of years.
dugong persian gulf
Man made damage harms dugongs and other Gulf Wildlife
The impact of oil production, war, and all the construction projects in and around the Persian Gulf has naturally had an adverse effect on marine and other wildlife in this region.
Previous Green Prophet articles have mentioned Dubai and Abu Dhabi real estate projects such as Dubai’s Palm Island and The World artificial islands, which have caused considerable damage to marine life in the areas where these projects have been constructed, and are presently being constructed.
The best example is the largest of these projects, The World, which is now causing serious damage to coral reefs, kelp, and the very sea grass  that the dugong feed upon. As was noted in this article, the delicate eco-system of coral reefs, mangrove coastal areas and sea grass habitats, have been depleted by more than 35%.
The sea water salinity in the Gulf has also increased, affecting sea life.  It was also noted that Island project promoters plan to import a number of dolphins from the Solomon Islands to add an extra attraction to the area, as well as creating a special “diver’s cave” where amateur scuba divers can hunt for “treasure” that the project promoters will put there for them.
In another article, a case study published in an American University educational website, one of the most constant threats posed to the dugongs of the Persian Gulf is that of water pollution; most especially water pollution as a result of oil spills.
With an enormous amount of the world’s oil supplies located in the Persian Gulf region, the transport of oil through the Persian Gulf is a fact of life. So too are oil spills. Oil in the water of the Persian Gulf destroys dugong habitats and is likely to have significant direct negative health effects on the dugong.
Efforts have been made to protect the dugong from being hunted or killed by fishermen when the mammals are trapped in fishing nets. Saudi Arabia and the UAE are signers to the CITES Agreement which is a world-wide resolution, adopted originally in 1963, to protect endangered animal species, of which the dudong and other similar species (manatee, etc) are now considered to be.
- See more at: http://www.greenprophet.com/2010/03/dugong-mermaid-persian-gulf/#sthash.TxbnqMdl.dpuf